Corporate Social Responsibility: not just a pursuit of ethical perfection, but a real pursuit of transparency

Identity and responsibility
18 January 2018
Communication and CSR
14 March 2018
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Corporate Social Responsibility: not just a pursuit of ethical perfection, but a real pursuit of transparency

We suggest reading the article “The scandal of virtuous men. Woe to him who judges” written by Leonardo Becchetti and published on Avvenire.it. The article contains considerations that are far from any belief. Read more
Becchetti underlies the deep hypocrisy that is behind 'the obsession of pursuing ethical'and moral perfection. It is a hypocrite obsession because it does not consider a “fundamental anthropological aspect” , that is the moral imperfection that characterises every human being. An obsession, as described by the author, in which also Corporate Social and Environmental Responsibility can trip over.

“A wise behaviour does not imply looking for people that are one hundred per cent good or that claim to be good.. The fact that sometimes there are scandals or negative news about a limited percentage of virtuous people is normal (but still, it remains something to point out)”.

For this reason, the impossibility of distinguishing the absolute good from the absolute bad does not mean denying both. Rather, setting ourselves the objective of a “good conduct” implies being aware that our path is made of downs and 'scandals'. It is right that people who make a mistake take responsibility for their actions, but more often who judges and enjoys others’ mistakes wants to justify his passivity and keep basking in the idea of an 'uncontrolled world'.

"The mistake of a 'virtuous man' is serious and must be condemned morally and civilly. But people who judge him and take advantage to find an excuse to their own passivity must be condemned equally". These are the words that end Becchetti’s article. We can just add that we believe in Corporate Social Responsibility, not as an obsessive pursuit of ethical perfection, but as a tool for transparency, as a path full of obstacles that will bring changes.